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Posts Tagged ‘Rosenwald’

The Invisible Government
From Modern History Project “A little learning is a dangerous thing”

The Council on Foreign Relations and the plans for a one-world Socialist dictatorship
By Dan Smoot, 1962

11. Interlocking Untouchables
The CFR interlock with the tax-exempt Foundations

The Cox and Reece Committees (1951-54)

Members of Congress are not unaware of the far-reaching power of the tax-exempt private organization — the CFR — but the power of the Council is somewhat indicated by the fact that no committee of Congress has yet been powerful enough to investigate it or the foundations with which it has interlocking connections and from which it receives its support.

On August 1, 1951, Congressman E. E. Cox (Democrat, Georgia) introduced a resolution in the House asking for a Committee to conduct a thorough investigation of tax-exempt foundations. Congressman Cox said that some of the great foundations “had operated in the field of social reform and international relations (and) many have brought down on themselves harsh and just condemnation.” (more…)

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Julius Rosenwald and Booker T Washington

Rosenwald and the Tuskegee Experiments

Begun in 1909 and published in 1928, the Oslo study reported on the natural history of untreated syphilis in a group of white males.  The racist assumptions then prevalent in American medicine biased physicians to assume that the disease would probably follow a different course in African-American males.  Hence white scientists saw value in replicating such a study among Black people in the U.S.

Macon County, east of Montgomery, was part of the “black belt” of Alabama so-called because of the rich dark soil.  It was home to the Tuskegee Institute, the foremost black college in the nation, run by Booker T. Washington. The county had few towns and was primarily populated by poor farmers, 90% of them African American.  In the 1930s it was severely depressed economically; and as in all of the South, public facilities were rigidly segregated.  The state spent $65 annually for each white student in the county schools, but only $7 for each black student.  The county had few doctors and only two hospitals, one of which, John Andrew Hospital, was on the grounds of the Tuskegee Institute and was primarily intended for Institute staff and students, even though it also served as the major source of medical care for much of the black community. (more…)

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Tuskegee Experiment aThe Tuskegee Experiment

From A Free Essay [Edited]

In 1932, in the area surrounding Tuskegee, Macon County, Alabama, the United States Public Health Service (PHS) and the Rosenwald Foundation began a survey and small treatment program for African-Americans infected with syphilis. The deepening depression, the lack of funds from the foundation, and the large number of untreated cases provided the government’s researchers with what seemed to be an unprecedented opportunity to study a seemingly almost “natural” experimentation of latent syphilis in African-American men.

What had begun as a “treatment” program thus was converted by the PHS researchers, under the imprimatur of the Surgeon General and with knowledge and consent of the President of Tuskegee Institute, the medical director of the Institute’s John A. Andrew Hospital, and the Macon County public (more…)

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