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Posts Tagged ‘Money out of Thin Air’

Image result for debt crisisTHE VALLEY OF THE SHADOW OF DEBT
By Carolyn Baker, 2006

Never before have political leaders urged such large-scale indebtedness on American consumers to rally the economy. — Kevin Phillips, in American Theocracy: The Peril and Politics Of Radical Religion, Oil, and Borrowed Money In The Twenty-First Century

In a recent conversation with a friend, a married mother of three, she anxiously confided that although she has never been scared about money in her entire adult life, she now, in her mid-forties, finds herself feeling terrified. “Sometimes I wonder,” she said tentatively, “if it’s our own fault or if it’s the world we now live in. I’ve never worked harder in my life, but I’ve never found myself and my family falling so far behind financially.”

[Many] are no doubt hearing similar anguish issuing from the mouths of friends and family, and in all likelihood, thinking similar thoughts, but they know that the frightening quagmire of debt in which (more…)

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The Simple, Literal Explanation
Patrick Byrne, Mark Mitchell, 2008

Part 1, here

You and I enter a stock trade. You buy a share of stock from me.  You hand over your money, and I hand over the share of stock. That is called, “settlement.”

It may surprise you to learn that there are loopholes in our nation’s regulations that permit some people, when it comes time to settle, to hand over nothing but an IOU.  By using one of these loopholes, when the time comes for settlement I can take your money but say, “I’m not delivering you any stock. I’m just giving you an IOU for a share of stock that I will deliver later.”

There are reasons these loopholes came into existence. If someone made a mistake by signing the wrong line on a form, for example, or mistakenly sold more shares than he really had, one would not want the (more…)

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Image result for magic moneyThe Simple, Metaphorical Explanation
Patrick Byrne, Mark Mitchell, 2008

When [we] travel to another country, the first thing we do when we land is change some US dollars into the local currency. Perhaps you change enough to get a cab to the hotel, go out and buy a meal, etc. For the duration of your stay you keep changing your dollars into the local currency to get around. Then when you are ready to leave, you take whatever you have left and you convert it back into dollars, or spend it, or give it away, and board the plane back to the United States.

Yet imagine that there are some travelers [who] are allowed to take a small machine that prints out the local currency. If they are in Paris, it prints out Euros. If they are in London, it spits out British Pounds. When in Mexico City, it prints pesos. And so on and so forth. On every trip, however, this special “currency machine” keeps track of how many (more…)

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“Project Omega” Reveals Secrets Of Dark Pools Stock Trading
By Pratap Chatterjee, CorpWatch Blog (2015)

Investment Technology Group (ITG), a U.S. stock broker, paid a $20.3 million fine for running a secret operation named Project Omega to take advantage of “dark pools” trading orders made by its clients. Experts say that Barclays and Credit Suisse may also soon pay fines for dark pools trading scams.

Most traders buy and sell stocks on public stock exchanges – but “dark pools” are essentially private stock markets located inside big banks that allow clients to place secret orders. Such systems have been in existence for 30 years and have become increasingly popular among institutional buyers who want to hide their identity or ensure that a large order does not cause the price to fluctuate. There are 45 such registered dark pools which now constitute as much as 40 percent of overall stock market trading in the U.S., according to the Tabb Group, a market research firm.

The biggest dark pools are CrossFinder which is run by Credit Suisse of Switzerland and Liquidity Cross (LX) which is run by Barclays of the UK. Union Bank of Switzerland also runs a dark pool called Price (more…)

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