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Posts Tagged ‘Medical Experiments’

US apologizes for infecting Guatemalans with STDs in the 1940s

By CNN, 2010

The United States apologized Friday for a 1946-1948 research study in which people in Guatemala were intentionally infected with sexually transmitted diseases.

A statement by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Secretary of Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius called the action “reprehensible.”

“We deeply regret that it happened, and we apologize to all the individuals who were affected by such abhorrent research practices,” the joint statement said. “The conduct exhibited during the study does not represent the values of the United States, or our commitment to human dignity and great respect for the people of Guatemala.” (more…)

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Julius Rosenwald and Booker T Washington

Rosenwald and the Tuskegee Experiments

Begun in 1909 and published in 1928, the Oslo study reported on the natural history of untreated syphilis in a group of white males.  The racist assumptions then prevalent in American medicine biased physicians to assume that the disease would probably follow a different course in African-American males.  Hence white scientists saw value in replicating such a study among Black people in the U.S.

Macon County, east of Montgomery, was part of the “black belt” of Alabama so-called because of the rich dark soil.  It was home to the Tuskegee Institute, the foremost black college in the nation, run by Booker T. Washington. The county had few towns and was primarily populated by poor farmers, 90% of them African American.  In the 1930s it was severely depressed economically; and as in all of the South, public facilities were rigidly segregated.  The state spent $65 annually for each white student in the county schools, but only $7 for each black student.  The county had few doctors and only two hospitals, one of which, John Andrew Hospital, was on the grounds of the Tuskegee Institute and was primarily intended for Institute staff and students, even though it also served as the major source of medical care for much of the black community. (more…)

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The Jonestown Dead
John Judge letter to Arianna Hufffington
Date: Sun, 26 May 2002
To: [arianna]
Subject: The Jonestown Dead
From: John Judge

Ms. Hufffington:

Since you once laughed your head off on your inaptly-titled show “Equal Time” on MSNBC as Gerald Posner maligned me for suggesting that the people who died at Jonestown did not commit suicide but were murdered, and your producers would not allow me “equal time” to respond to his castigations, I thought I’d drop a note just to clear up the record. The “kool-aid hit squad,” as you found it so hilarious to call them, did exist and they used something much more lethal. (more…)

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Remembering Jonestown
From Stabroek News, 1998

It was twenty years ago last week that news of the events at Jonestown was broadcast to an incredulous public. To this day, Guyanese hardly regard the mass [murder] as being a part of their own local history, and in a sense they are right. While the Jonestown residents occupied a portion of Guyana’s land space, they were not incorporated into its body politic. For the most part United States citizens, they acted out a tragedy which was peculiarly American in its origins as well as its character.

The sheer numbers involved – 909 in the final count – will cause Jonestown to be remembered for as long as mankind walks this planet. There are precedents for it, but the best known of them – the suicide pact of 960 Jewish Zealots at the fortress of Masada – has been questioned by archaeologists, while that at Saipan, when 1,000 Japanese civilians threw themselves from a cliff just before the island was taken by American forces during the Second World War, has been lost in the mind-boggling statistics of death for that war as whole. (more…)

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Mind Control & Timothy McVeigh’s Rise from “Robotic” Soldier to Mad Bomber
By Alex Constantine, archived 013101

The more we do to you, the less you seem to believe we are doing it. – Joseph Mengele

The popular conception was spun by the press corps like a clay urn: McVeigh, the volatile minute man, was so bitter after failing to make the Army’s “elite” Special Forces, so stuffed full of the froth of the Turner Diaries, that he vented his rage on the Alfred Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City.

But Captain Terry Guild, McVeigh’s’ former platoon leader, told reporters that the failure to become a Green Beret left the Iraq War veteran “upset. Not angry. Just very, very disappointed.” In the Army, he demonstrated a willingness to carry out orders, any orders. He trained on his own time while other soldiers languished in their bunks or caroused at the PX. (more…)

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How Jones used drugs
Narcotics as a control
By Peter King, San Francisco Examiner, 1978

Potential troublemakers or defectors from the Peoples Temple flock in Jonestown were kept under tight control in a special “extended-care unit” where they were heavily drugged, according to former residents of the jungle commune.
There were enough dangerous drugs at the remote compound — thousands of doses of anti-depressants and downers — to treat each of the 900 cultists who lived there hundreds of times.
Although the temple had an official anti-drug policy — some members were ex-addicts who had kicked the habit under Jim Jones’ influence — there were enough drugs at the mission to supply a city the size of Georgetown, Guyana (population 66,000), according to an American pathologist who inspected the scene.
Police and government authorities in Guyana are sorting out documents pertaining to drugs found at Jonestown as their investigation spreads into areas beyond the killings. The drug question has been a low priority up to now. (more…)

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Jonestown survivors talk of concentration camp existence
By Robert James, The Stanford Daily, Volume 175, Issue 1, 29 January 1979

Two members of the Peoples Temple who escaped the Jonestown camp last November addressed a psychology class here last Tuesday. Both Diane Louie, 26, and Richard Clark, 42, made their first public presentation as part of Prof. Philip Zimbardo’s class, “The Human Connection.” Louie and Clark have been active members of the Temple for over six years, they said.

They fled the settlement into the Guyana jungle November 17, the day of the arrival of the late Rep. Leo Ryan (D-San Mateo). The following day, Ryan and his party were ambushed and the mass suicides occurred.

The speakers attributed psychic powers to the group’s leader, the Rev. Jim lones, including the ability to (more…)

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