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Posts Tagged ‘Ethics’

US apologizes for infecting Guatemalans with STDs in the 1940s

By CNN, 2010

The United States apologized Friday for a 1946-1948 research study in which people in Guatemala were intentionally infected with sexually transmitted diseases.

A statement by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Secretary of Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius called the action “reprehensible.”

“We deeply regret that it happened, and we apologize to all the individuals who were affected by such abhorrent research practices,” the joint statement said. “The conduct exhibited during the study does not represent the values of the United States, or our commitment to human dignity and great respect for the people of Guatemala.” (more…)

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Julius Rosenwald and Booker T Washington

Rosenwald and the Tuskegee Experiments

Begun in 1909 and published in 1928, the Oslo study reported on the natural history of untreated syphilis in a group of white males.  The racist assumptions then prevalent in American medicine biased physicians to assume that the disease would probably follow a different course in African-American males.  Hence white scientists saw value in replicating such a study among Black people in the U.S.

Macon County, east of Montgomery, was part of the “black belt” of Alabama so-called because of the rich dark soil.  It was home to the Tuskegee Institute, the foremost black college in the nation, run by Booker T. Washington. The county had few towns and was primarily populated by poor farmers, 90% of them African American.  In the 1930s it was severely depressed economically; and as in all of the South, public facilities were rigidly segregated.  The state spent $65 annually for each white student in the county schools, but only $7 for each black student.  The county had few doctors and only two hospitals, one of which, John Andrew Hospital, was on the grounds of the Tuskegee Institute and was primarily intended for Institute staff and students, even though it also served as the major source of medical care for much of the black community. (more…)

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Image result for reagan and bushPublic Papers of the Presidents
Address to the Nation on the Iran Arms and Contra Aid Controversy and Administration Goals
Ronald Reagan, August 12, 1987
[Edited, DTS]

My fellow Americans:

I’ve said on several occasions that I wouldn’t comment about the recent congressional hearings on the Iran-contra matter until the hearings were over. Well, that time has come, so tonight I want to talk about some of the lessons we’ve learned. But rest assured, that’s not my sole subject this evening. I also want to talk about the future and getting on with things, because the people’s business is waiting.

These past 9 months have been confusing and painful ones for the country. I know you have doubts in your own minds about what happened in this whole episode. What I hope is not in doubt, however, is my commitment to the investigations themselves. So far, we’ve had four investigations—by (more…)

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The Paris “Peace” Accords Were a Deadly Deception
by Ken Hughes, 2013

“The Agreement on Ending the War and Restoring Peace in Vietnam,” signed January 27, 1973, never looked like it would live up to its name. Four decades later it stands exposed as a deliberate fraud.

The president of South Vietnam, in whose defense more than 50,000 Americans gave their lives, wept upon hearing President Richard Nixon’s proposed settlement terms. Hanoi would release American prisoners of war and agree that the South could choose its government by free elections, but the accords threw the voting process to a commission that could act only by unanimity — all but impossible to achieve among [Viet Cong] and anti-[Viet Cong] who’d spent years shooting out their differences. Worse, Nixon would leave North Vietnamese troops occupying and controlling much of the South, while withdrawing all remaining American ground forces. (more…)

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[Peace is at hand]
By Ian C. Friedman, 2010

“We believe that peace is at hand.” – Henry Kissinger, October 26, 1972

As President Nixon successfully campaigned for reelection in 1972, many of his goals for Vietnamization were being met, including a decrease in U.S. casualties, a drop in spending for the war, the quieting of domestic dissent, an increase in his popularity, and the provision of time to negotiate a settlement.  Leading Nixon’s negotiating team was his influential national security advisor, Henry Kissinger.

He was born Heinz Alfred Kissinger to a comfortably middle class Jewish family on May 27, 1923 in Furth, Germany. […] Kissinger’s mother prevailed upon his father to move the family to the United States in August 1938. He attended City College of New York before serving as a German interpreter in the U.S. Army during World War II.  He returned to America after the war and received his undergraduate and doctorate degrees from Harvard and he remained there to serve on the political science faculty. (more…)

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October 1972: “Peace is at hand”

Hanoi’s October Surprise

President Nixon combined his launching of Operation Linebacker with a new diplomatic initiative. In a nationally televised speech on May 8, the President announced a change in the US negotiating position. For years the US had wanted a two track approach to the negotiations—settling the political and military issues separately—while North Vietnam wanted both issues settled together. The US demanded a complete withdrawal of North Vietnamese troops from South Vietnam. Furthermore, the US wanted a political solution that kept the Thieu regime in place in Saigon. Meanwhile, the North Vietnamese, demanded an unconditional withdrawal of all US forces from Vietnam and a provisional government that excluded Thieu.

In his diplomatic initiative of May 8, President Nixon announced that the US would accept a cease-fire in place as a precondition for its military withdrawal. In other words, the US would withdraw its forces from South Vietnam without North Vietnam doing the same. The conditions for a settlement were reduced to three: (more…)

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Theresa May husband, Theresa May, Philip John MayPhilip John May, Theresa May’s Husband: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know
By Daniel S. Levine, June 30, 2016, Updated July 13, 2016 [Edited]

Former U.K. Home Secretary Theresa May took over as Prime Minister of the U.K. on Wednesday, as Cameron turned over the keys to 10 Downing Street.

Here’s a look at Philip John May.

1. Does May Own Shares in Security Firm G4S? No

An online rumor that continues to follow May to this day is that he owned shares or had a major executive position at G4S, an international security firm. This rumor began on blogs, (more…)

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