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Failed Banks 2007

List of bank failures in the United States

The 2008 financial crisis led to the failure of a large number of banks in the United States. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) closed 465 failed banks from 2008 to 2012. In contrast, in the five years prior to 2008, only 10 banks failed, of which 3 in 2007.

A bank failure is the closing of a bank by a federal or state banking regulatory agency. The FDIC is named as Receiver for a bank’s assets when its capital levels are too low, or it cannot meet obligations the next day. After a bank’s assets are placed into Receivership, the FDIC acts in two capacities—first, it pays insurance to the depositors, up to the deposit insurance limit, for assets not sold to another bank. Continue Reading »

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WAR IRAQ VS KWAITManaging the Crisis: The FDIC and RTC Experience
Chronological Overview: Chapter Fourteen—1991

[The] Bank Insurance Fund (BIF) dropped below zero to a negative $7 billion. On April 30, 1991, the FDIC issued a regulation raising the deposit insurance assessment rate from 19.5 cents to 23 cents per $100 in assessable deposits. That increase in assessment revenue was designed to help offset BIF losses, which had been outpacing revenue since 1984.

Economic/Banking Conditions

While the U.S. was still involved in the Persian Gulf War, the U.S. economy had negative growth in 1991 with Gross Domestic Product down 0.97 percent.14-1 Employment growth also was negative at -2.1 percent. The unemployment rate continued to rise with a substantial increase to 6.8 percent, up from 5.6 percent a year earlier.14-2 The discount rate decreased by more than one and a half points to 5.5 percent, and the 30-year mortgage rate fell to 9.3 percent.14-3 Inflation also was down slightly at 4 percent.14-4 Home sales and housing starts remained steady while the office vacancy rate continued to rise and was at 18.9 percent.14-5 Total real estate loans in the U.S. continued to increase to 26 percent of assets, as did commercial real estate loans, rising to 7.3 percent.

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Sea Fare

Clipart - Cobalt Ornate Dharma WheelThe Invisible Government
From Modern History Project “A little learning is a dangerous thing”

5. Business Advisory Council
Aligning business interests and government policy

The Business Advisory Council (1933-61)

Whereas the Foreign Policy Association-World Affairs Center is primarily interested in fostering the foreign policy desired by the CFR, and the Committee for Economic Development is primarily interested in formulating economic and other policies which, through governmental controls, will lead us into total socialism — another, smaller (but, in some ways, more powerful) organization has (or, until mid-1961, had) the primary responsibility of infiltrating government: of selecting men whom the CFR wants in particular jobs, and of formulating, inside the agencies of government, policies which the CFR wants. This small but mighty organization was the Business Advisory Council.

Daniel C. Roper, F. D. Roosevelt’s Secretary of Commerce, formed the Business Advisory Council on June 26, 1933. Continue Reading »

See Far

The Invisible Government
From Modern History Project “A little learning is a dangerous thing”

The Council on Foreign Relations and the plans for a one-world Socialist dictatorship
By Dan Smoot, 1962

11. Interlocking Untouchables
The CFR interlock with the tax-exempt Foundations

The Cox and Reece Committees (1951-54)

Members of Congress are not unaware of the far-reaching power of the tax-exempt private organization — the CFR — but the power of the Council is somewhat indicated by the fact that no committee of Congress has yet been powerful enough to investigate it or the foundations with which it has interlocking connections and from which it receives its support.

On August 1, 1951, Congressman E. E. Cox (Democrat, Georgia) introduced a resolution in the House asking for a Committee to conduct a thorough investigation of tax-exempt foundations. Congressman Cox said that some of the great foundations “had operated in the field of social reform and international relations (and) many have brought down on themselves harsh and just condemnation.” Continue Reading »

Gallery For > DefenseRODNEY SITCH ON THE CIA AND FBI CONNECTION TO TERRORISTS AND THE CORRUPTION OF THOSE WHO CONTROL U.S. AIR TRAVEL
By Rodney Stich [Excerpted]

Member
Association Former Intelligence Officers (AFIO); Association of National Security Alumni
International Society of Air Safety Investigators (ISASI); Lawyers Pilots Bar Association (LPBA)
Former FAA air safety investigator; Former airline captain and Navy pilot

July 30, 1996

V. Stewart Daley, Special Agent

Ref: TWA Flight 800; SAM missiles offered to US and rejected; and July 24, 1996 meeting with FBI agent.

Dear Sir:

The purpose of this letter is to make a record relating to what transpired during a meeting and Continue Reading »

The World's 10 Richest Terrorist OrganizationsCommittee on the Present Danger

The Committee on the Present Danger denotes a series of hawkish US establishment pressure groups. The original committee founded in 1950, was revived twice, in 1976 and 2004.

Both the first and second incarnations of the Committee sought to use public pressure to influence debates already underway within the Government, concerning the NSC-68 document in 1950, and the Team B exercise in 1976, each of which exaggerated the Soviet threat. The 1976 Committee was the first in which the neoconservatives emerged as a signicant force within the hawkish coalition. They would go on to be the dominant strand in the 2004 Committee which attempted to apply a similar logic to the war on terror.

First CPD (1950-1953) Continue Reading »

North Korea Seen Practicing Evasion Tactics with March ... Continue Reading »