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Archive for the ‘War Economy’ Category

Walgreen's - New uses for failed banks - Pictures - CBS NewsList of banks acquired or bankrupted during the Great Recession

This is a list of notable financial institutions worldwide that were severely affected by the Great Recession centered in 2007–2009. The list includes banks (including savings and loan associations, commercial banks and investment banks), building societies and insurance companies that were:

  • taken over or merged with another financial institution;
  • nationalised by a government or central bank; or
  • declared insolvent or liquidated.

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Buying Failed BanksList of bank failures in the United States

The 2008 financial crisis led to the failure of a large number of banks in the United States. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) closed 465 failed banks from 2008 to 2012. In contrast, in the five years prior to 2008, only 10 banks failed, of which 3 in 2007.

A bank failure is the closing of a bank by a federal or state banking regulatory agency. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) is named as Receiver for a bank’s assets when its capital levels are too low, or it cannot meet obligations the next day. The FDIC insures up to $250,000 per depositor, per insured bank.

2010 (more…)

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List of bank failures in the United States

The 2008 financial crisis led to the failure of a large number of banks in the United States. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) closed 465 failed banks from 2008 to 2012. In contrast, in the five years prior to 2008, only 10 banks failed, of which 3 in 2007.

A bank failure is the closing of a bank by a federal or state banking regulatory agency. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) is named as Receiver for a bank’s assets when its capital levels are too low, or it cannot meet obligations the next day. The FDIC insures up to $250,000 per depositor, per insured bank.

2009

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Banks and the Economy: The FDIC Expects Bank Failures to Peak this YearDust Off Your Files: The FDIC Is Back in Town
By Laurence E. Platt et al., August 2008

The recent appointment of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) as conservator of IndyMac Bank and receiver of the First National Bank of Nevada and First Heritage Bank, N.A. (collectively, “FNBN”) has caused many lawyers to recall from storage their files on the role of the FDIC and the now defunct Resolution Trust Corporation (“RTC”) in the liquidation of thousands of failed banks and thrifts over 15 years ago.

FDIC and RTC were often a source of unmitigated pain to the failed institutions they liquidated and the counterparties to contracts that were in effect at the time [they] failed. At the same time, FDIC and RTC presented unsurpassed opportunities for those with cash to purchase loans and assets from their receiverships [reception].

Those who have servicing or other contracts with IndyMac and FNBN are experiencing (more…)

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Top 7 Biggest Bank Failures - Slideshow | InvestopediaList of bank failures in the United States

The 2008 financial crisis led to the failure of a large number of banks in the United States. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) closed 465 failed banks from 2008 to 2012. In contrast, in the five years prior to 2008, only 10 banks failed, of which 3 in 2007.

A bank failure is the closing of a bank by a federal or state banking regulatory agency. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) is named as Receiver for a bank’s assets when its capital levels are too low, or it cannot meet obligations the next day. The FDIC insures up to $250,000 per depositor, per insured bank, as a result of the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008, which raised the limit from $100,000. (more…)

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List of bank failures in the United States

The 2008 financial crisis led to the failure of a large number of banks in the United States. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) closed 465 failed banks from 2008 to 2012. In contrast, in the five years prior to 2008, only 10 banks failed, of which 3 in 2007.

A bank failure is the closing of a bank by a federal or state banking regulatory agency. The FDIC is named as Receiver for a bank’s assets when its capital levels are too low, or it cannot meet obligations the next day. After a bank’s assets are placed into Receivership, the FDIC acts in two capacities—first, it pays insurance to the depositors, up to the deposit insurance limit, for assets not sold to another bank. (more…)

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WAR IRAQ VS KWAITManaging the Crisis: The FDIC and RTC Experience
Chronological Overview: Chapter Fourteen—1991

[The] Bank Insurance Fund (BIF) dropped below zero to a negative $7 billion. On April 30, 1991, the FDIC issued a regulation raising the deposit insurance assessment rate from 19.5 cents to 23 cents per $100 in assessable deposits. That increase in assessment revenue was designed to help offset BIF losses, which had been outpacing revenue since 1984.

Economic/Banking Conditions

While the U.S. was still involved in the Persian Gulf War, the U.S. economy had negative growth in 1991 with Gross Domestic Product down 0.97 percent.14-1 Employment growth also was negative at -2.1 percent. The unemployment rate continued to rise with a substantial increase to 6.8 percent, up from 5.6 percent a year earlier.14-2 The discount rate decreased by more than one and a half points to 5.5 percent, and the 30-year mortgage rate fell to 9.3 percent.14-3 Inflation also was down slightly at 4 percent.14-4 Home sales and housing starts remained steady while the office vacancy rate continued to rise and was at 18.9 percent.14-5 Total real estate loans in the U.S. continued to increase to 26 percent of assets, as did commercial real estate loans, rising to 7.3 percent.

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