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Archive for the ‘Science of War’ Category

New York Times SyndicateThe Relationship Between Globalization and Militarism
by Steven Staples, Social Justice magazine, Vol. 27, No. 4 (2000)

Globalization and militarism should be seen as two sides of the same coin. On one side, globalization promotes the conditions that lead to unrest, inequality, conflict, and, ultimately, war. On the other side, globalization fuels the means to wage war by protecting and promoting the military industries needed to produce sophisticated weaponry. This weaponry, in turn, is used-or its use is threatened-to protect the investments of transnational corporations and their shareholders.

1. Globalization Promotes Inequality, Unrest, and Conflict
Economic inequality is growing; more conflict and civil wars are emerging. It is important to see a connection between these two situations. Proponents of global economic integration argue that (more…)

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Photos from the Women's March on the WTO Protests; Hong ...The WTO has failed developing nations
Aurelie Walker, The Guardian, 2011

In the 10 years since the WTO pledged to deliver pro-development changes, developing countries have been completely sidelined by the global powers

Ten years ago, a new World Trade Organisation that put developing country needs at the centre of the international trade negotiation agenda was proposed. The Ministerial Declaration adopted at the start of the Doha Development Round of trade negotiations, on 14 November 2001, was a promising response to the anti-globalisation riots of the 1990s.

But the WTO membership has failed to deliver the promised pro-development changes. Finding “development” in the Doha Development Round today is like looking for a needle in a haystack. Developing countries have been completely sidelined by the economic and political interests of global powers. (more…)

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WTO Special Page, witiger.comReal battle for Seattle
By John Vidal, The Guardian, 1999

‘This is what democracy looks like,’ chanted protesters as they confronted armies of police firing tear gas canisters and plastic bullets.

The globalisation debate

‘Shame, shame, shame on you,’ chanted the protesters beyond the lines of Darth Vader-style police, the armoured cars, the horsemen, the National Guard and the dogs. The tear gas was heavy on the air, the police were now firing plastic bullets into the weeping crowd and the Ministerial Round of the Seattle world trade talks was in crisis.

The opening ceremony had just been cancelled because delegates were being corralled in their hotel suites. Even the combative US trade representative Charlene Barshefsky was unable to attend.

On the front line of the protest a small debate was taking place. Two African delegates were trying to get through the lines of protesters. (more…)

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Iran, Oil and Strait of HormuzAttacking Iran –
By ING, 2007 [Edited]

The market impact of a surprise Israeli strike on its nuclear facilities

The financial markets are assuming that an Israeli or US attack on Iran is unlikely. However, an imminent build-up of US forces in the Gulf suggest that they could be in for a shock.

An imminent attack would seem unlikely, given the weakness of the US administrations, and hopes for regime change in Iran. However, Iran’s threats that it will acquire nuclear weapons within two years, suggest that President Bush may sanction action before he leaves office at the end of 2008. And, within a month the US will have two aircraft carrier battle groups and a new expeditionary Marine strike force in the Persian Gulf, which might provide a shield for an Israeli bombing of Iran’s facilities. (more…)

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Villatri - Informaciones: febrero 2012ING Bank to Pay $619 Million Fine in Largest Ever US Economic Sanctions Penalty
From Steptoe.com, June 18, 2012

On June 12, 2012, ING Bank, N.V. (ING Bank), a [Dutch] financial institution, agreed to forfeit $619 million to settle criminal charges brought by the United States and the State of New York and civil claims raised by the US Department of the Treasury, Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC).  ING Bank was charged with conspiring to violate US economic sanctions and with violating New York state laws by illegally moving billions of dollars through the US financial system on behalf of Cuban and Iranian entities.  The $619 million fine is the largest ever against a financial institution in connection with an investigation into US sanctions violations and related offenses. (more…)

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Banks and the Economy: The FDIC Expects Bank Failures to Peak this YearDust Off Your Files: The FDIC Is Back in Town
By Laurence E. Platt et al., August 2008

The recent appointment of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) as conservator of IndyMac Bank and receiver of the First National Bank of Nevada and First Heritage Bank, N.A. (collectively, “FNBN”) has caused many lawyers to recall from storage their files on the role of the FDIC and the now defunct Resolution Trust Corporation (“RTC”) in the liquidation of thousands of failed banks and thrifts over 15 years ago.

FDIC and RTC were often a source of unmitigated pain to the failed institutions they liquidated and the counterparties to contracts that were in effect at the time [they] failed. At the same time, FDIC and RTC presented unsurpassed opportunities for those with cash to purchase loans and assets from their receiverships [reception].

Those who have servicing or other contracts with IndyMac and FNBN are experiencing (more…)

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WAR IRAQ VS KWAITManaging the Crisis: The FDIC and RTC Experience
Chronological Overview: Chapter Fourteen—1991

[The] Bank Insurance Fund (BIF) dropped below zero to a negative $7 billion. On April 30, 1991, the FDIC issued a regulation raising the deposit insurance assessment rate from 19.5 cents to 23 cents per $100 in assessable deposits. That increase in assessment revenue was designed to help offset BIF losses, which had been outpacing revenue since 1984.

Economic/Banking Conditions

While the U.S. was still involved in the Persian Gulf War, the U.S. economy had negative growth in 1991 with Gross Domestic Product down 0.97 percent.14-1 Employment growth also was negative at -2.1 percent. The unemployment rate continued to rise with a substantial increase to 6.8 percent, up from 5.6 percent a year earlier.14-2 The discount rate decreased by more than one and a half points to 5.5 percent, and the 30-year mortgage rate fell to 9.3 percent.14-3 Inflation also was down slightly at 4 percent.14-4 Home sales and housing starts remained steady while the office vacancy rate continued to rise and was at 18.9 percent.14-5 Total real estate loans in the U.S. continued to increase to 26 percent of assets, as did commercial real estate loans, rising to 7.3 percent.

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