Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Science of War’ Category

A phone signal grabber or IMSI-catcher is one of the most powerful devices for conducting surveillance and invading your privacy – legally or illegally. Which is why not just anyone is allowed to possess one. This little beauty can perform loads of magic tricks including cloning your phone, intercepting calls and SMSes, turning your phone into a transmitter and much, much more.

Meet The Grabber: How government and criminals can spy on you (and how to protect yourself)
By Shaun Swingler, 01 Sep 2016 (South Africa)

Last week an Israeli-made cellphone signal grabber, or IMSI-catcher, made headlines after amaBhungane published an investigation into Willie Lotter and Joseph Pooe, who were arrested by (more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Painkiller demand drives crop expansion beyond Tasmania

GEOFF HISCOCK, Contributing writer

SYDNEY — Strong global demand for painkillers is underpinning moves in Australia, the world’s biggest legal grower of opium alkaloids, to expand the cultivation of opium poppies.

Consumers around the world spend about $30 billion a year on pain medication, with North America and Europe the biggest markets for codeine, thebaine, morphine and other opiates that go into branded pharmaceutical products such as Panadeine, OxyContin and Roxanol.

From just 10% of the total production area, Australia produces about half of the concentrate of poppy straw (CPS) used by the global pharmaceutical industry, ahead of Turkey (23%), France (21%) and Spain (4%).

Crossing the water (more…)

Read Full Post »

New York Times SyndicateThe Relationship Between Globalization and Militarism
by Steven Staples, Social Justice magazine, Vol. 27, No. 4 (2000)

Globalization and militarism should be seen as two sides of the same coin. On one side, globalization promotes the conditions that lead to unrest, inequality, conflict, and, ultimately, war. On the other side, globalization fuels the means to wage war by protecting and promoting the military industries needed to produce sophisticated weaponry. This weaponry, in turn, is used-or its use is threatened-to protect the investments of transnational corporations and their shareholders.

1. Globalization Promotes Inequality, Unrest, and Conflict
Economic inequality is growing; more conflict and civil wars are emerging. It is important to see a connection between these two situations. Proponents of global economic integration argue that (more…)

Read Full Post »

Photos from the Women's March on the WTO Protests; Hong ...The WTO has failed developing nations
Aurelie Walker, The Guardian, 2011

In the 10 years since the WTO pledged to deliver pro-development changes, developing countries have been completely sidelined by the global powers

Ten years ago, a new World Trade Organisation that put developing country needs at the centre of the international trade negotiation agenda was proposed. The Ministerial Declaration adopted at the start of the Doha Development Round of trade negotiations, on 14 November 2001, was a promising response to the anti-globalisation riots of the 1990s.

But the WTO membership has failed to deliver the promised pro-development changes. Finding “development” in the Doha Development Round today is like looking for a needle in a haystack. Developing countries have been completely sidelined by the economic and political interests of global powers. (more…)

Read Full Post »

WTO Special Page, witiger.comReal battle for Seattle
By John Vidal, The Guardian, 1999

‘This is what democracy looks like,’ chanted protesters as they confronted armies of police firing tear gas canisters and plastic bullets.

The globalisation debate

‘Shame, shame, shame on you,’ chanted the protesters beyond the lines of Darth Vader-style police, the armoured cars, the horsemen, the National Guard and the dogs. The tear gas was heavy on the air, the police were now firing plastic bullets into the weeping crowd and the Ministerial Round of the Seattle world trade talks was in crisis.

The opening ceremony had just been cancelled because delegates were being corralled in their hotel suites. Even the combative US trade representative Charlene Barshefsky was unable to attend.

On the front line of the protest a small debate was taking place. Two African delegates were trying to get through the lines of protesters. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Iran, Oil and Strait of HormuzAttacking Iran –
By ING, 2007 [Edited]

The market impact of a surprise Israeli strike on its nuclear facilities

The financial markets are assuming that an Israeli or US attack on Iran is unlikely. However, an imminent build-up of US forces in the Gulf suggest that they could be in for a shock.

An imminent attack would seem unlikely, given the weakness of the US administrations, and hopes for regime change in Iran. However, Iran’s threats that it will acquire nuclear weapons within two years, suggest that President Bush may sanction action before he leaves office at the end of 2008. And, within a month the US will have two aircraft carrier battle groups and a new expeditionary Marine strike force in the Persian Gulf, which might provide a shield for an Israeli bombing of Iran’s facilities. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Villatri - Informaciones: febrero 2012ING Bank to Pay $619 Million Fine in Largest Ever US Economic Sanctions Penalty
From Steptoe.com, June 18, 2012

On June 12, 2012, ING Bank, N.V. (ING Bank), a [Dutch] financial institution, agreed to forfeit $619 million to settle criminal charges brought by the United States and the State of New York and civil claims raised by the US Department of the Treasury, Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC).  ING Bank was charged with conspiring to violate US economic sanctions and with violating New York state laws by illegally moving billions of dollars through the US financial system on behalf of Cuban and Iranian entities.  The $619 million fine is the largest ever against a financial institution in connection with an investigation into US sanctions violations and related offenses. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »