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Archive for the ‘Financial Framework’ Category

Banks and the Economy: The FDIC Expects Bank Failures to Peak this YearDust Off Your Files: The FDIC Is Back in Town
By Laurence E. Platt et al., August 2008

The recent appointment of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) as conservator of IndyMac Bank and receiver of the First National Bank of Nevada and First Heritage Bank, N.A. (collectively, “FNBN”) has caused many lawyers to recall from storage their files on the role of the FDIC and the now defunct Resolution Trust Corporation (“RTC”) in the liquidation of thousands of failed banks and thrifts over 15 years ago.

FDIC and RTC were often a source of unmitigated pain to the failed institutions they liquidated and the counterparties to contracts that were in effect at the time [they] failed. At the same time, FDIC and RTC presented unsurpassed opportunities for those with cash to purchase loans and assets from their receiverships [reception].

Those who have servicing or other contracts with IndyMac and FNBN are experiencing (more…)

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List of bank failures in the United States

The 2008 financial crisis led to the failure of a large number of banks in the United States. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) closed 465 failed banks from 2008 to 2012. In contrast, in the five years prior to 2008, only 10 banks failed, of which 3 in 2007.

A bank failure is the closing of a bank by a federal or state banking regulatory agency. The FDIC is named as Receiver for a bank’s assets when its capital levels are too low, or it cannot meet obligations the next day. After a bank’s assets are placed into Receivership, the FDIC acts in two capacities—first, it pays insurance to the depositors, up to the deposit insurance limit, for assets not sold to another bank. (more…)

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WAR IRAQ VS KWAITManaging the Crisis: The FDIC and RTC Experience
Chronological Overview: Chapter Fourteen—1991

[The] Bank Insurance Fund (BIF) dropped below zero to a negative $7 billion. On April 30, 1991, the FDIC issued a regulation raising the deposit insurance assessment rate from 19.5 cents to 23 cents per $100 in assessable deposits. That increase in assessment revenue was designed to help offset BIF losses, which had been outpacing revenue since 1984.

Economic/Banking Conditions

While the U.S. was still involved in the Persian Gulf War, the U.S. economy had negative growth in 1991 with Gross Domestic Product down 0.97 percent.14-1 Employment growth also was negative at -2.1 percent. The unemployment rate continued to rise with a substantial increase to 6.8 percent, up from 5.6 percent a year earlier.14-2 The discount rate decreased by more than one and a half points to 5.5 percent, and the 30-year mortgage rate fell to 9.3 percent.14-3 Inflation also was down slightly at 4 percent.14-4 Home sales and housing starts remained steady while the office vacancy rate continued to rise and was at 18.9 percent.14-5 Total real estate loans in the U.S. continued to increase to 26 percent of assets, as did commercial real estate loans, rising to 7.3 percent.

(more…)

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The Invisible Government
From Modern History Project “A little learning is a dangerous thing”

The Council on Foreign Relations and the plans for a one-world Socialist dictatorship
By Dan Smoot, 1962

11. Interlocking Untouchables
The CFR interlock with the tax-exempt Foundations

The Cox and Reece Committees (1951-54)

Members of Congress are not unaware of the far-reaching power of the tax-exempt private organization — the CFR — but the power of the Council is somewhat indicated by the fact that no committee of Congress has yet been powerful enough to investigate it or the foundations with which it has interlocking connections and from which it receives its support.

On August 1, 1951, Congressman E. E. Cox (Democrat, Georgia) introduced a resolution in the House asking for a Committee to conduct a thorough investigation of tax-exempt foundations. Congressman Cox said that some of the great foundations “had operated in the field of social reform and international relations (and) many have brought down on themselves harsh and just condemnation.” (more…)

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Foundation for Defense of Democracies

The Foundation for Defense of Democracies (FDD) is a neoconservative think tank based in Washington, D.C., which was founded two days after the September 11th attack in 2001.[1][2] In its own words, it “uniquely combines policy research, democracy training, strategic communications, and investigative journalism. We focus our efforts where opinions are formed and, ultimately, where the war of ideas will be won or lost: in the media, on college campuses, and in the policy community, at home and abroad.”[3]

In 2004, FDD reincarnated the Cold War relic Committee on the Present Danger in support of the so-called ‘war on terror’. George W. Bush used FDD as a platform for the launch of his National Security Strategy 2006[4].

Selling the Iraq War  (more…)

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FilmMattic: Movie Review: Too Big to FailTHE AIG RESCUE, ITS IMPACT ON MARKETS, AND THE GOVERNMENT’S EXIT STRATEGY

CONGRESSIONAL OVERSIGHT PANEL
JUNE OVERSIGHT REPORT, JUNE 10, 2010

FIGURE 3: GOVERNMENT ASSISTANCE TO AIG AS OF MAY 27, 2010 2
[Dollars in millions]
Amount Authorized — Amount Outstanding as of 5/27/10
Federal Reserve [Inc.]
Revolving Credit Facility … $34,000 — $26,133
Maiden Lane II: Loan extended by Federal Reserve [Inc.] … 22,500 — 14,532
Net portfolio holdings of Maiden Lane II LLC … 0 — 15,910
Accrued interest payable to Federal Reserve [Inc.] … 0 — 342
Maiden Lane III: Loan extended by Federal Reserve [Inc.] … 30,000 — 16,206
Net portfolio holdings of Maiden Lane III LLC 3 … 0 — 23,380
Accrued interest payable to Federal Reserve [Inc.] … 0 — 427
Preferred interest in AIA Aurora LLC … 16,000 — 16,266
Accrued dividends on preferred interests in AIA Aurora LLC 0 — 125
Preferred interest in ALICO SPV … 9,000 — 9,150
Accrued dividends on preferred interests in ALICO Holdings LLC 0 — 70
Total Federal Reserve [Inc.] … 111,500 — 83,251

TARP (more…)

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The “too big to fail” theory asserts that certain corporations, particularly financial institutions, are so large and so interconnected that their failure would be disastrous to the greater economic system, and that they therefore must be supported by government when they face potential failure. — Wikipedia

THE AIG RESCUE, ITS IMPACT ON MARKETS, AND THE GOVERNMENT’S EXIT STRATEGY

CONGRESSIONAL OVERSIGHT PANEL
JUNE OVERSIGHT REPORT*

JUNE 10, 2010.—Ordered to be printed

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY*
At its peak, American International Group (AIG) was one of the largest and most successful companies in the world, boasting a AAA credit rating, over $1 trillion in assets, and 76 million customers in more than 130 countries. Yet the sophistication of AIG’s operations was not matched by an equally sophisticated risk-management structure. This poor management structure, combined with a lack of regulatory oversight, led AIG to accumulate staggering amounts [liabilities], (more…)

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